decluttering is hard

When you first start decluttering, it can be an exciting process. You get rid of things, and it feels like a weight has been lifted…

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When you first start decluttering, it can be an exciting process. You get rid of things, and it feels like a weight has been lifted off your shoulders. But then what happens? You stop making progress. It’s hard to keep up with the amount of stuff that keeps accumulating in your home if you’re not willing to declutter regularly and strategically.

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Masses of research proves that having too much stuff makes us more stressed, less creative and less happy.

  • Clutter can make us anxious.

Clutter, some makes us feel anxious. This can lead to a general feeling of not being able to cope with our environment and the pressure that comes along with it. We may also be more likely to feel overwhelmed by clutter than those who are organized.

  • Clutter stresses us out physically.

It doesn’t just affect our mental health, either—clutter can also cause physical stress in your body due to the chemicals released during “fight or flight” situations (which we experience whenever we see something we perceive as threatening).

Decluttering is hard work!

Decluttering is hard. It’s hard to let go of things you have grown attached to, even if they no longer serve their original purpose. For example, I once had a pair of shoes that were from my first year in college. They were comfortable and had the perfect heel height for running around campus, but eventually they didn’t fit on my feet anymore. They were also falling apart after many years of use and abuse—so I decided it was time for them to go!

But even with all this going for me, it was still really hard to get rid of those shoes (and other items I’ve donated over the years). And that’s because there are several reasons why decluttering can be so difficult:

If you want to become a happy minimalist, you’ve got to do it right. And that means letting go of some things that are hard to let go of.

If you want to become a happy minimalist, you’ve got to do it right. And that means letting go of some things that are hard to let go of.

Decluttering is hard work—it’s not something you can just do in an afternoon or even a week. There are going to be times when it feels like it’ll never be done, but every time you throw something out or give away something else, the process gets easier and easier.

But what about all those things? How do I get rid of them? Can I really live without this one thing? Am I doing enough? Those questions plague me every day as I try my best not only declutter but also downsize my belongings from our apartment into storage containers so we can travel with two large suitcases instead of trunks full of stuff we don’t need anymore (or ever).

It’s been said many times before: decluttering your home clears your mind space for other things like happiness or productivity—but sometimes there just isn’t enough room!

There’s no point in decluttering if you’re just going to fill up the newly freed space with new stuff.

If you’re like most people, though, your first reaction to the idea of decluttering is “But what if I need that book again?” Let’s start with the obvious: chances are you WILL need those books again. They’re probably in your house somewhere (or at least should be). But even if they aren’t and have moved on to other lives and homes—and even if it’s been a really long time since you’ve seen or thought about them—that doesn’t mean they haven’t served their purpose. What would happen if we weren’t able to learn from our past mistakes?

That said, there is no sense in keeping stuff just because we think we might want it later on down the road. The truth is that most of us don’t wear clothes more than once before washing them, yet many people keep clothes for years after they stopped fitting well or became outdated fashion trends. And while there may be some sentimental value attached to those items (perhaps they were gifts from a loved one), holding onto them because of this only makes it harder for us when we finally do decide to let go of these items and move on with our lives.

Decluttering can improve your mental and physical health.

Decluttering can improve your mental and physical health. If you’re like most people, you don’t get enough sleep, which can lead to feelings of anxiety and stress. Letting go of items you don’t need or use anymore helps reduce clutter that can add to the stress of everyday life.

You may also be surprised by how much better it feels when you declutter outside your home as well! When we clear out our closets or storage spaces, we often find things we forgot existed—and once they’re back in action again, things just feel better all around! Plus, if you have a yard sale or donate items in high demand (like old clothes), then it’s even more money in your pocket at the end of the day!

When you live with less clutter around us, we experience less stress overall because there are fewer distractions from what matters most: spending time with family members; enjoying hobbies; working on projects together; etcetera…

Clutter increases your stress levels and that has negative effects on your mental and physical health.

Clutter increases your stress levels, which has negative effects on your mental and physical health. That’s because clutter makes you feel overwhelmed by all the stuff in your life that isn’t useful or fun. You might be aware of how much stuff you have but still feel like there isn’t enough room for all of it. The more you try to relax, the more stressed out you get by thinking about all that clutter.

That can be a trigger for depression, anxiety and other mental health problems such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Research shows that people who hoard often have high levels of anxiety and depression compared to people without hoarding tendencies who don’t hoard things but live in similar circumstances with similar incomes etc…

There are countless reasons why decluttering is so important, but I’m going to list some of the top ones here.

Decluttering can help you to have a more positive outlook on life. Decluttering your home is one of the most important things you can do for yourself, and it will help you to be happier with life. Here’s why:

  • Decluttering will reduce stress levels
  • Clutter increases your stress levels and that has negative effects on your mental and physical health
  • Clutter can lead to poor sleep, headaches and other problems
  • A decluttered space is easier to clean, which leaves more time for fun activities like playing video games or spending time with friends

Why get rid of stuff? Sure, there are tons of different ways our possessions can cause us problems every day, but there are also tons of benefits of decluttering.

Why get rid of stuff? Sure, there are tons of different ways our possessions can cause us problems every day, but there are also tons of benefits of decluttering.

Decluttering is hard work. It’s not easy to let go of things that you may have invested time or money in. And yet, you know deep down that your new minimalist lifestyle will be better for you in the long run. By getting rid of old items and making room for new things—or just not having so many things around at all—you will feel more focused and organized in life. You’ll also save time tidying up and cleaning because less clutter means less mess! If a particular item does not bring joy into your life anymore then it’s time for it to go!

If you have been decluttering for a while, and then suddenly you stop making progress like you used to, it might be time for a change in strategy. Here are 5 signs it’s time for a change in your decluttering approach.

If you have been decluttering for a while, and then suddenly you stop making progress like you used to, it might be time for a change in strategy. Here are 5 signs it’s time for a change in your decluttering approach:

  1. You’re not making progress.
  2. You’re not getting rid of things.
  3. You’re not decluttering regularly.
  4. Your method doesn’t work for you or is unsustainable (i.e., it’s too hard).
  5. Not changing strategy If you’re not making progress, it might be time to change your strategy. For example, if you’re sorting through boxes in an attic or basement and then leaving them there because they seem too overwhelming to tackle all at once—then maybe decluttering is not the right approach for that particular area. A better option would be tackling one box at a time until everything has been dealt with.

It’s hard but worthwhile

It’s important to note that decluttering is hard work. It’s not easy, and it’s not a one-time thing—it takes time and effort to declutter your life. But let me tell you from experience: it’s worth it! I’m sure you’re wondering if your mind will ever be clear enough for you to get back on track with your goals and dreams (or even just find what’s hiding in those boxes). The answer is yes—and here are some reasons why:

  • Decluttering gives you control over your environment instead of letting the environment control you. Once all the clutter has been removed from your home, office, or apartment, only then will it start working for rather than against its inhabitants.
  • Getting rid of physical objects helps sort through mental clutter too because stuff tends to bring up reminders of past experiences that we may want forgotten or don’t need anymore (for example: old love letters). When we get rid of these reminders we can eliminate any negative emotions they cause us as well as open ourselves up for fresh new experiences in our lives!

Conclusion

If you want to be happy and healthy, decluttering is a must. It’s not something that you can do overnight, but the benefits are worth it.

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